220709_Nava_Youthies-Mag_Analog_0221.jpg

set Oh Carla

necklace Ilenia Corti Vernissage by NextAgency

breast Jewellery custom Laura Maria Tonelli

220709_Nava_Youthies-Mag_Analog_0256.jpg

NAVA PROJECT

ear cuff Margherita Chinchio

face jewellery and choker Hyperobjects

chain dress Wovo

Nawrūz

220709_Nava_Youthies-Mag_Digital_1642_edited.jpg

talent NAVA PROJECT @navaproject press office OUT LOUD @outloud_pr photo and art direction IRENE TRANCOSSI @irenetrancossi styling and art direction LAURA MARIA TONELLI @artificialmaria set design and art direction CHIARA TRANCOSSI @chiaratrancossi hair styling MARCO SERVINA @comevaconma make up ELISABETTA PANZIROLI @elisabettapanziroli_mua styling assistant GAIA CASALINO @weevd interview CATERINA DI LUZIO @katediluzio

#youthieseditorials

headpiece Flavia Cavalcanti

wool choker and silver crossbody belt Ineden 

breast jewellery custom Laura Maria Tonelli

skirt Federico Pilia by Stove Communication

220709_Nava_Youthies-Mag_Digital_0281.jpg

dress John Zucca by Stove Communication

220709_Nava_Youthies-Mag_Analog_0119.jpg

earrings custom Laura Maria Tonelli 

corset SV Fashion Designer 

(ENG)

 

text Caterina di Luzio

Experimental electronic welcomes ancestral rhythms. East and West meet, making a new geography. English, Farsi and Italian mingle, giving birth to the language of the soul. In this kaleidoscopic universe moves songwriter Nava Golchini, aka Nava: born in Teheran, she moved to Milan when she was seventeen, and in the Italian city she began studying and making music. After a productive collaboration with producer Francesco Fugazza and musicians Marco Fugazza and Elia Pastori, she made her solo debut in 2021 with the powerful visual Ep Bloom. Her latest creation is Nafas, which means “breath” in Farsi, the first of three Ep's that make up an extremely personal project. In this interview we talk with her about language, roots and places we learn to call home.

Hi Nava. June saw the start of your summer tour. What was it like to come back to live performance?

Hi! Fortunately, I kept on going also during the fall and winter season so that was a great way to stay in shape and on top of things. It helped me a lot to get to the summer tour fully ready because other than my show with my full band I have created a solo artist show and also a DJ set! All of which created through a massive amount of team work. The more gigs I do, the more I feel like I’m growing and I have loads of ideas on how to change and improve the show and leave everyone breathless.

Your latest Ep, Nafas, is the first chapter of an upcoming trilogy. How did this work come about?

It all happened quite naturally actually, me and my team got together and figured out a way to shed light on all the concepts I wanted to touch base with. So we decided to divide them into three parts so each part would have its own palette and would be very clear and detailed.

 

In writing your lyrics you use English, Italian and Farsi. Is there a ratio behind the choice of these idioms? Are there moods or images that you prefer to tell in one language rather than another?

Actually, I just sort of follow what comes to me, it depends on the concept I’m trying to describe and which language helps me describe it accurately. At the beginning I thought it could be destructive using three languages at once in an EP, but then I said, well if I want to be as honest as possible, I’m made up of these three languages so might as well try. At the beginning I found comfort in English but now I love how I express myself in Italian, I feel it quite mine. The most difficult part was integrating Farsi because it’s a completely distant language from the other two, but it was very interesting to fit in, in its own way.

 

As you have often told, Italy for you was supposed to be just a place of passage, the stop on a journey chosen almost randomly; instead, it has become your home for several years now. How living in this country has influenced your music and your imagery?

It really opened my eyes, I’m naturally a curious person which makes it easy for me to experiment and meet new people and learn different things about them. This led me to creating my visual and musical team, the two go hand in hand in this project.

 

In your artistic path, in fact, music, fashion and photography are in constant conversation. Can you tell us more about this aspect?

The visual part takes up 50% of my project. My goal is to create an experience, something that transports you to a different dimension. In an ideal world people could play my music and watch a hologram but for now I have to focus on creating that experience during my live shows.

 

It is said that sometimes you have to go back to where you came from in order to understand where you are going. Has this journey back to your Persian origins, led through music, opened up new perspectives for you?

I absolutely agree with this saying, This Ep has really been a trip in the past in order to shed light on the future. It allowed me to see where I’d like to go and what I would like to take along with me from my past.

 

This editorial is inspired by Nowruz, the festivity celebrating the Persian New Year, a time of deep renewal. What was it like to take part in this project?

It was an incredible experience! I think we were a brilliant squad and everything was organized to the tiniest detail. We had a tight schedule with many looks to shoot in different locations, each curated to the fullest, we even had a scout help us out by keeping the bon fire in control. Paying my respect to nature is very important to me and I would never do anything to harm it. It was all on point, the location, the looks, hair, make up accessories everything! I loved being one with nature and being re born as the earth does during our Nowruz festivities.

 

Speaking of new beginnings: was there a moment in your life that you would associate with the concept of "rebirth"?

Yes! When NAVA became my solo project, I think that was a major rebirth moment where I realize what I want from this project and where I’d like to take it under each aspect possible imaginable.

 

Your music takes its inspiration from ancient rituals, it’s haunted by demons and divinities. How do you live spirituality?

I’m a firm believer in Karma and in reincarnation so I live everyday life based on these beliefs. I think it helps me be a better person.

 

Can you tell us anything about your future projects?

I can only reveal that were getting even closer to my idea of entering  another dimension. Were working on crazy pieces with Gadi Sassoon 555n, the producer of Gaz and we even recorded live traditional Persian instruments! The result is very special. Stay tuned!

220709_Nava_Youthies-Mag_Analog_0139.jpg

headpiece Flavia Cavalcanti

chain and crystal set Aaalphacentauri

220709_Nava_Youthies-Mag_Analog_0042.jpg

dress John Zucca by Stove Communication

220709_Nava Youthies-Mag_Digital_4000 .jpg
 

ear cuff Margherita Chinchio

face jewellery and choker Hyperobjects

chain dress Wovo

220709_Nava_Youthies-Mag_Analog_0139.jpg

headpiece Flavia Cavalcanti

chain and crystal set Aaalphacentauri

220709_Nava_Youthies-Mag_Analog_0042.jpg

dress John Zucca by Stove Communication

220709_Nava Youthies-Mag_Digital_4000 .jpg
220709_Nava_Youthies-Mag_Digital_1373.jpg

headpiece Flavia Cavalcanti

wool choker and silver crossbody belt Ineden 

breast jewellery custom Laura Maria Tonelli

skirt Federico Pilia by Stove Communication

(ITA)

 

text Caterina di Luzio

L’elettronica sperimentale accoglie ritmi ancestrali. Oriente e occidente si incontrano, componendo una nuova geografia. L’inglese, l’italiano e il farsi si mescolano in libertà, dando vita alla lingua dell’anima. In questo universo caleidoscopico si muove la cantautrice Nava Golchini, in arte Nava: nata a Teheran, si trasferisce a Milano a diciassette anni, e nel capoluogo lombardo inizia a studiare e fare musica. Dopo una fertile collaborazione col produttore Francesco Fugazza e i musicisti Marco Fugazza ed Elia Pastori, esordisce da solista nel 2021 con il potente visual Ep Bloom. La sua ultima creatura è Nafas, che in Farsi significa “respiro”, il primo di tre Ep che compongono un progetto estremamente personale. In quest’intervista parliamo con lei di linguaggio, radici e luoghi che impariamo a chiamare casa.

Ciao Nava. A giugno è iniziato il tuo tour estivo. Com’è stato tornare a esibirti dal vivo?

Ciao! Fortunatamente non ho mai smesso di suonare anche durante l’autunno e l’inverno, la strategia è qualità versus quantità! Ma sono arrivata carichissima a queste date estive perché, oltre al mio live con la band, ho debuttato con il mio spettacolo solista e i Dj set! Il tutto sempre realizzato grazie ad un gigantesco team work! Più date faccio più idee nascono e cresco artisticamente, con l’obiettivo di lasciare l’audience a bocca aperta.

Il tuo ultimo Ep, Nafas, è il primo capitolo di una trilogia in uscita. Come è nato questo lavoro?

In una maniera molto naturale in realtà, con il mio team volevamo trovare un racconto per il progetto che fosse più sincero e dettagliato possibile, perciò abbiamo deciso che sarebbe stata una buona idea dividerlo in tre parti: ciascuno dei tre Ep segue una sua palette e allo stesso tempo ogni parte è collegata, perché alla fine il collante sarò io. Questo era il modo con cui ho potuto raccontarmi con più chiarezza, con tutti i dettagli, senza che alcune idee venissero perse per strada.

 

Nella scrittura dei tuoi testi utilizzi l’inglese, l’italiano e il farsi. C’è un criterio dietro la scelta di questi idiomi? Ci sono stati d’animo o immagini che preferisci raccontare in una lingua piuttosto che in un’altra?

In verità seguo quello che mi viene, istintivamente, dipende dal concetto che sto cercando di dipingere e di conseguenza quale delle tre lingue può essere più adatta in questo intento. All’inizio pensavo che potesse creare confusione usare tre lingue ma poi mi sono detta “io vivo attraverso queste tre lingue, perciò sarà la cosa più vera nel mio caso”. Sceglievo più spesso inglese, ma vivendo sempre da più tempo in Italia, sto cominciando a trovarmi a mio agio a raccontarmi anche in italiano e mi piace come suono, lo sento mio. La cosa più difficile e cercare di inserire il Farsi perché è totalmente alieno ed è stata la lingua più difficile da integrare, ma allo stesso tempo è stato molto interessante il processo.

Come hai raccontato spesso, l’Italia per te doveva essere solo uno luogo di passaggio, la tappa di un viaggio scelta in modo quasi casuale; è diventata invece la tua casa da diversi anni. Vivere in questo paese come ha influenzato la tua musica e il tuo immaginario?

Mi ha regalato le persone che mi hanno ampliato la vista, sono una persona curiosa, perciò mi interessa sperimentare cose diverse, conoscere sempre persone nuove e questo mi ha portato ad avere la squadra che ho la fortuna di avere intorno, musicale e visiva, due aspetti che per me hanno la stessa importanza.

Nel tuo percorso artistico, infatti, musica, moda e fotografia sono in dialogo continuo. Puoi raccontarci meglio questo aspetto?

La parte visiva costituisce il 50% del mio lavoro. Vorrei creare un’esperienza che sia sonora e visiva, un portale in cui entrare in un’altra dimensione. In un mondo ideale si potrebbe ascoltare la mia musica e vedere un ologramma, per adesso posso solo focalizzarmi sull’esperienza che vorrei creare almeno durante i live.

Si dice che a volte bisogna tornare da dove si viene, per capire dove si sta andando. Questo viaggio a ritroso nelle tue origini persiane, condotto tramite la musica, ti ha aperto nuove prospettive?

Sono d’accordissimo con questo detto, questo EP è stato veramente un viaggio nel passato per chiarire il futuro. Mi ha fatto vedere dove vorrei arrivare e cosa vorrei portarmi dietro delle mie radici.

 

Questo editoriale si ispira al Nowruz, la festa che celebra il nuovo anno persiano, un momento di profondo rinnovamento. Com’è stato prendere parte a questo progetto?

È stato veramente incredibile, secondo me siamo stati una squadra brillante. Tutto è stato organizzato al meglio, avevamo tanti look da scattare -tutti pensati nel minimo dettaglio- in location pazzesche! Dal movimento della luna, a ritrovarci a chiamare uno scout per aiutarci con il fuoco per realizzare uno shooting che fosse rispettoso nei confronti della natura, che è una delle cose più importanti per me. Tutto mi ha lasciato senza fiato! Mi è piaciuto tanto essere immersa nella natura e rinascere con lei durante questo shooting, come si fa nel Nowruz.

 

A proposito di nuovi inizi: c'è stato un momento della tua vita che assoceresti al concetto di “rinascita”?

Sì, penso quando il progetto NAVA si è evoluto ed è diventato il mio progetto solista, c’è stata una rinascita della mia persona, di quello che volevo da questo progetto e dove volevo portarlo sotto tutti gli aspetti possibili e immaginabili.

 

La tua musica attinge ispirazione ad antichi rituali, è popolata da demoni e divinità. Qual è il tuo rapporto con la spiritualità?

Credo molto nel Karma e nella reincarnazione, perciò vivo tutto in funzione di questo. Penso che mi aiuti ad essere una persona migliore.

 

Ci puoi dire qualcosa dei tuoi progetti futuri?

Vi spoilero solo che stiamo lavorando su alcuni pezzi pazzeschi con Gadi Sassoon 555n, il produttore di Gaz, e ci stiamo avvicinando sempre di più al mio concetto di “altra dimensione”. Tra gli artisti coinvolti ci saranno anche strumentisti tradizionali persiani e il risultato sarà veramente speciale, ma è tutto ancora un work in process.

above: headpiece Flavia Cavalcanti

choker and crossbody belt Ineden 

breast jewellery custom Laura Maria Tonelli

skirt Federico Pilia by Stove Communication

above: headpiece Flavia Cavalcanti

choker and crossbody belt Ineden 

breast jewellery custom Laura Maria Tonelli

skirt Federico Pilia by Stove Communication

220709_Nava_Youthies-Mag_Analog_0247.jpg

ear cuff Margherita Chinchio

face jewellery and choker Hyperobjects

chain dress Wovo