0.4_Sylvie Fleury_Turn Me On_First spaceship on Venus_Credit Installation view Pinacoteca

Unexpected narratives

Sylvie Fleury at the Pinacoteca Agnelli in Turin

Sylvie Fleury

Turn Me On, until 15.01.2023

Curated by Sarah Cosulich and Lucrezia Calabrò Visconti

Pinacoteca Agnelli, Turin

text Gianfranco Petriglieri

image courtesy Pinacoteca Agnelli Torino

credit Mybosswas

2.1_Sylvie Fleury_Turn Me On_Credit Installation view Pinacoteca Agnelli Torino.jpg

Unexpected Narratives

Sylvie Fleury at Pinacoteca Agnelli in Turin

 

Valuing the past to write the future. Based on this principle, the new artistic and curatorial direction of Sarah Cosulich for the Pinacoteca Agnelli in Turin takes off. Since last May, it has seen a rethinking of the museum space and the setting up of its collections starting from the recovery and the study of the historical architecture that houses it.

The Lingotto, an industrial building designed by Giacomo Matte-Trucco in 1916 and connected to the automotive production of Fiat, aims to become a leading cultural center for the city. The museum goes beyond its borders to take possession of an open environment, overlooking the city, as the legendary test track located on the top of the building and already hosting a hanging garden located 28 meters high with over 40,000 plants. A suspended park enriched with the Pista 500 project of an exhibition artistic installations that embrace the different languages of contemporary sculpture. The project includes decontextualized historical works and site-specific commissions by Nina Beier, VALIE EXORT, Shilpa Gupta, Louise Lawler, Marc Leckley and Cally Spooner: they engage a dialogue with the imprint of industrial archeology and they are part of an open-air exhibition, characterized by a constantly changing exhibition path. While Nina Beier's monumental lions The Guardians reflect on the cultural and social stratification evoked by objects that surround us, VALIE EXORT in Die Dopperlgängerin - two enormous intertwined scissors - suggests a reflection on the female body, using an instrument stereotypically associated with the activities of women. The museum becomes the repository of a plurality of stories and a multiplicity of perspectives.

The intervention of the Swiss artist, Sylvie Fleury (Geneva, 1961), to whom the Turin institution dedicates the first complete retrospective in Italy, is situated in this perspective of semantic references and historical exchanges. The title of the exhibition already appears as a clear manifesto. Turn me on alludes both to the ignition of the engine and to the sphere of eroticism, a sort of advertising slogan that winks at fetishization, prompting an in-depth study on the theme of the production of desire; that for the object and that for the body, which have always been inextricably linked in commercial language.

The more than sixty works of the exhibition constitute an immersive and fluid story developed in seven exhibition rooms that reproduce the main aspects of Sylvie Fleury's thirty-year artistic research, located outside of any classification of the traditional art history. The public literally penetrates the work of this "punk feminist in disguise", as she likes to define herself, passing through environments that stimulate the senses and the mind, starting from the typical museum display with windows that winks at luxury boutiques, passing for a fitting room, a natural cave up to land in a spatial landscape. Fleury experiments and plays with mixed techniques and materials, such as video, embroidery, collage, the use of neon lights, and stages an unprecedented mix of high and low sources, drawing on its own visual and lexical references both from pop culture (magazines, films) and  icons of art history, such as Piet Mondrian and the masters of Minimalism.

The first chapter of the exhibition is the ironic installation Please, no more of that kind of stuff, a title taken from one of the comments pinned in the guest notebook of Fleury's first exhibition. Here she brings together a series of assemblages objects, arranged in display cases, extrapolated from their usual context and stripped of their original function, such as the gun transformed into a hairdryer, golden handcuffs and the obsessive use of stiletto heels - silver, studded - which reaffirm an all-female centrality. Fleury questions the gender stereotypes proposed both by mass culture and by artistic historiography, which has traditionally exalted and given space only to the male creative genius. It comes back to mind the title of a well-known essay by art critic Linda Nochlin, why aren't there great artists? Why has the creation account always been one-sided?

In the video Walking on Carl Andre she presents a sequence in which women in stiletto heels walk, crushing, on the famous Squares of the minimalist artist; in The Eternal Wow, on the other hand, she takes up Daniel Buren's typical vertical stripe motifs inviting the public to free themselves from myths and legends. The appropriation becomes for Fleury an artistic practice aimed at denunciation. The need to claim the female role also recurs in works of science fiction and cinema inspiration. First Spaceship on Venus calls for the appropriation of women in space, using an almost apocalyptic fiction movie’s iconography. Just like in a movie set, a flaming shocking pink wall painting is the backdrop to foam rockets covered in white fur: Fleury unhinges history and voices a narrative against patriarchy.

3.8_Sylvie Fleury_Turn Me On_Please, no more of that kind of stuff__Credit Installation vi

INSTALLATION VIEW. PLEASE NO MORE OF THAT KIND OF STAFF

6_Sylvie Fleury_Turn Me On_Please, no more of that kind of stuff__Credit Installation view
3.7_Sylvie Fleury_Turn Me On_Please, no more of that kind of stuff__Credit Installation vi
4.1_Sylvie Fleury_Turn Me On_Walking on Carl Andre__Credit Installation view Pinacoteca Ag

INSTALLATION VIEW. WALKING ON ANDRE

She devils on wheels, the installation that closes the exhibition in the gallery, is a tribute to the film of the same name directed in 1968 by the American director Hershell Gordon Lewis: the story based on blood, revenge and terror of a gang of all female biker, the Man-Eaters. Taking up the imagery and psychedelic aesthetics of film production, in the Nineties Fleury founded her own car fan club, open to all people who identify themselves as women. The artist subverts the traditional vision of the garage as a purely masculine space: in the Fleury club there are references to the typical furnishings of a mechanical workshop, such as branded suits, erotic magazines and of course spare parts, here treated as museum works of arts, in the perspective of the Dadaist ready-made tradition.

On the Pista her works dominate the Turin skyline. Turning our thoughts to the past, here we can imagine Fleury’s women at the wheel ideally competing with the Fiat drivers grappling with car tests. They press the accelerator of the car with their silver décolleté; they stand up to men drivers.

 

On top of the Lingotto the red neon light Yes to All is an invitation to the public to confront the processes that regulate our digital devices: the phrase is in fact taken from the message of  computers that invites the user to choose between different commands. A simplification that facilitates routine operations but it also appears as careless acceptance. In the museum context, this work also assumes the value of a political declaration, extending the same kind of acceptance to a principle of radical inclusiveness. Yes to all wants to witness a new vision of the museum, open to everyone without distinction.

Fleury questions the appearances of our everyday life: “Sometimes all you need is to scratch the surface, other times you have to blow it to pieces”.

9_Sylvie Fleury_Turn Me On_She devils on wheels - Cristal Custom Commando__Credit Installa

INSTALLATION VIEW. SHE DEVILS ON WHEELS, Cristal Custom Commando

9.4_Sylvie Fleury_Turn Me On_She devils on wheels__Credit Installation view Pinacoteca Agn
9.3_Sylvie Fleury_Turn Me On_She devils on wheels__Credit Installation view Pinacoteca Agn
0.2_Sylvie Fleury_Turn Me On_Yes to all.Credit Installation view Pinacoteca Agnelli Torino

ITA

Unexpected Narratives

Sylvie Fleury alla Pinacoteca Agnelli di Torino

 

Valorizzare il passato per scrivere il futuro. Sulla base di questo principio prende le mosse la nuova direzione artistica e curatoriale di Sarah Cosulich per la Pinacoteca Agnelli di Torino che, dallo scorso maggio, ha visto un ripensamento dello spazio del museo e dell’allestimento delle proprie collezioni partendo dal recupero e dallo studio dell’architettura storica che lo ospita.

Il Lingotto, un edificio industriale del 1916 progettato da Giacomo Matte-Trucco e connesso alla produzione automobilistica della Fiat, mira a diventare un polo culturale di punta per la città: il museo esce dai propri confini per appropriarsi di un ambiente aperto, affacciato sulla città, come la leggendaria pista di collaudo posta sulla sommità dell’edificio e ospitante un giardino pensile situato a 28 metri di altezza con oltre 40.000 piante. Un parco sospeso arricchito con il progetto Pista 500 di un percorso espositivo di opere e installazioni artistiche che abbracciano i diversi linguaggi della scultura contemporanea. Si affiancano lavori ricontestualizzati e commissioni site-specific di Nina Beier, VALIE EXORT, Shilpa Gupta, Louise Lawler, Marc Leckley e Cally Spooner: da un lato mettono in atto un dialogo con l’impronta dell’archeologia industriale, dall’altro si configurano come una mostra all’aperto, contraddistinta da un percorso espositivo in continua trasformazione. Mentre i monumentali leoni The Guardians di Nina Beier riflettono sulla stratificazione culturale e sociale evocata dagli oggetti che ci circondano, VALIE EXORT in Die Dopperlgängerin – due enormi forbici intrecciate – suggerisce una riflessione sul corpo femminile attraverso il ricorso ad uno strumento stereotipicamente associato ad attività delle donne: il museo si fa depositario di una pluralità di storie e una molteplicità di prospettive.

In quest’ottica di rimandi semantici e di scambi storici, si situa l’intervento dell’artista svizzera Sylvie Fleury (Ginevra, 1961), cui l’istituzione torinese dedica la prima retrospettiva completa in Italia. Il titolo della mostra appare già un chiaro manifesto di intenti. Turn me on allude sia alla accensione del motore sia alla sfera dell’erotismo, una sorta di slogan pubblicitario che ammicca alla feticizzazione, spingendo ad un approfondimento sul tema della produzione del desiderio; quello per l’oggetto e quello per il corpo, da sempre indissolubilmente legati nel linguaggio commerciale.

Le oltre sessanta opere della mostra mettono in scena un racconto immersivo e fluido sviluppato in sette sale espositive, dove sono proposti i nuclei principali della ricerca artistica trentennale di Sylvie Fleury, situata al di fuori di qualsiasi etichetta della tradizionale periodizzazione della storia dell’arte. Il pubblico penetra letteralmente l’opera di questa “femminista punk sotto mentite spoglie”, come ama definirsi, passando attraverso ambienti che stimolano i sensi e la mente: partendo dal tipico allestimento museale a vetrine che strizza l’occhio alle boutique di lusso, si passa attraverso un camerino di prova, una grotta naturale fino ad approdare in un paesaggio spaziale. Fleury sperimenta e gioca con le tecniche e i materiali, quali il video, il ricamo, il collage, l’utilizzo del neon luminoso, e mette in scena un inedito mix di fonti alte e basse, attingendo i proprio riferimenti visuali e lessicali dalla cultura pop (le riviste, i film) e dalle icone sacre della storia dell’arte, come Piet Mondrian e i maestri del minimalismo.

Il primo capitolo della mostra è l’ironica installazione Please, no more of that kind of stuff ( titolo ripreso da uno dei commenti appuntati nel quaderno degli ospiti della prima mostra di Fleury) dove riunisce in teche una serie di assemblaggi e di oggetti, estrapolati dal loro contesto abituale e spogliati della loro funzione originaria. Si ritrovano una pistola trasformata in phon, manette dorate e la presenza ricorrente di scarpe con il tacco a spillo -  argentate, borchiate - che riaffermano una centralità tutta al femminile: Fleury gioca con le categorie e mette in discussione gli stereotipi di genere proposti dalla cultura di massa e dalla storiografia artistica che ha tradizionalmente esaltato e dato spazio al solo genio creativo maschile. Torna alla mente il titolo di un noto saggio della critica d’arte Linda Nochlin, perché non ci sono grandi artiste?  Perché il racconto sulla creazione è sempre stato unilaterale?

Nel video Walking on Carl Andre presenta una sequenza filmica in cui donne con i tacchi a spillo camminano, schiacciandoli, i famosi Squares dell’artista minimalista; in The Eternal Wow, invece riprende i tipici motivi a strisce verticali di Daniel Buren invitando il pubblico a liberarsi dai miti e dalle leggende: l’appropriazione diventa per Fleury una pratica finalizzata alla denuncia.

La necessità di rivendicazione del ruolo femminile ricorre anche nelle opere di ispirazione fantascientifica e cinematografica. First Spaceship on Venus reclama l’appropriazione delle donne dello spazio, attraverso il ricorso ad una iconografia quasi apocalittica da fiction movie. Proprio come in un set cinematografico, un wall painting rosa shocking fiammeggiante fa da sfondo a razzi in gommapiuma e rivestiti di pelliccia bianca: Fleury scardina la storia e dà voce ad una narrazione contro il patriarcato.

She devils on wheels, l’installazione che chiude la mostra nel percorso della pinacoteca, è un tributo all’omonima pellicola diretta dal regista americano Hershell Gordon Lewis nel 1968: la storia a base di sangue, vendetta e terrore di una gang di biker tutta al femminile, le Man-Eaters. All’inizio degli anni Novanta Fleury, riprendendo l’immaginario e l’estetica psichedelica della produzione cinematografica, costituisce il proprio fan club automobilistico, aperto a tutte le persone che si identificano come donne. Nell’istallazione l’artista sovverte la tradizionale visione del garage quale spazio di appannaggio puramente maschile: nel club di Fleury trovano spazio rimandi all’arredo tipico di una officina meccanica, come le tute brandizzate, le riviste erotiche e naturalmente i pezzi di ricambio, qui musealizzati e tirati a lucido, nell’ottica del ready made di tradizione dadaista.

Sulla Pista le sue opere dominano lo skyline torinese: qui possiamo immaginare le donne al volante dei video di Fleury gareggiare idealmente con i piloti della Fiat alle prese con le prove delle autovetture. Premono l’acceleratore con la punta delle loro décolleté; gli tengono testa.

In cima al Lingotto, il neon rosso Yes to All è un invito al pubblico a confrontarsi con i processi che regolano i nostri dispositivi digitali: la frase è infatti ripresa dal messaggio dei computer che invita l’utente a scegliere tra diversi comandi. Una semplificazione che facilita operazioni di routine ma che rappresenta anche una forma di incauta accettazione. L’opera, nel contesto museale, assume anche il valore di una dichiarazione politica, estendendo quella stessa accettazione a un principio di inclusività radicale. Yes to all vuole segnalare una nuova visione del museo, dichiaratamente aperto a tutte e tutti, senza distinzioni.

Fleury mette in discussione le apparenze della nostra quotidianità: “A volte tutto ciò che serve è grattare la superficie, altre volte bisogna farla saltare in aria”.

Sylvie Fleury

Turn Me On, until 15.01.2023

Curated by Sarah Cosulich and Lucrezia Calabrò Visconti

Pinacoteca Agnelli, Turin

text Gianfranco Petriglieri

image courtesy Pinacoteca Agnelli Torino

credit Mybosswas

 
DJI_0469.jpg